Video Restoration Thread

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Dennis196492
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 9150Post Dennis196492 »

That's the big mystery, there is virtually no behind-the-scenes stories for this and all wikipedia says is that ''Animation fell behind and additional coloring had to be done at a Hungarian animation studio'', an statement left unsourced which could only mean one of many things.

It can be easily understood for something like The Thief where many scenes were re-shot like censoring the spike in the Dying Soldier, but for this is like there must've been a mess to organize the material to send it to Hungary, as there are character animation flat out missing, and the previously mentioned effects, there might also be the case with sending them the animation drawings but not the actual cels as many scenes were also completely re-done.

There are some stuff in here too I've yet to see:
https://web.archive.org/web/20070529080 ... ntactus.cf
Message: Of all the movies you've made, what's the one you're the least proud of and why?
Reply: James, That's a difficult question. We've had a few miss fires. Probably "The Pebble and the Penguin" is one of the low moments. The film was distributed by MGM/UA but apparently in the contract they had the right to "final cut" approval. The film was only about 80% animated, the balance was in storyboard form. The men that MGM/UA sent in, had issues with the story, the voice recording, the humor, you name it. Don had already finished the storyboarding and the crew was very excited with the story and were in the crunch mode to complete the film. Gary & Don had already been signed by Fox to help create & head up a new Animation studio back in the U.S. Don went into story development on the Fox front, Gary remained in position to complete the direction and sweatboxing for Pebble, until the news came for story changes. Gary left the production as he knew they could not complete the film with all of the production values planned for it. This means that Gary was not there for the final direction of the character animation, special effx animation, color model approvals, the sound design, music spotting, final dubbing, color timing of the film or the color correct video mastering. We heard later that they even asked the voice actors to rerecord their parts for the film. Looking at the film on DVD today, drives home the point that a film has to be taken to the end by its creators. When you listen to the tracks, the film feels flat, without the energy it once had. Also the color looks muddy and on the verge of RED, a horrible color when put to video (there is a lot of "bleeding" of color and it causes the other colors to appear somewhat less vibrant). The crew, who had come to Fox with Don and Gary advised them not to see the film. Don and Gary did everything they could legally to remove their names from the film. In the end, the distributors argued and won, to keep the title "A Don Bluth Ireland LTD Presentation" at the head of the film. However, if you review the credits, you will see that there is no "Directed by" credit. The production manager, Russel Bowland was credited as the producer. Fair play to him, he faced an impossible task to get the film fininshed. The story is based on the fact that male Adeli Penguins actually find a pebble and offer it to the female of their choice. If she accepts, they are mated for life. We loved the idea of animating the penguins and thought that the character Rocko, played by Jim Belushi, would be the favorite among the viewers. We really enjoyed working with Barry Manilow and Bruce Sussman for the songs and music. In the end, the final product looks so dismal, even with some very nice animation. The original Backgrounds and colored cels are actually brilliantly stunning to look at. The fact that the color was not attended to, at the film and video stages, makes it very difficult to watch. Neither Don, nor Gary have watched the final product through its entirety. It's painful. Didn't really want to share this info. Thanks for writing. Regards.
Reply Posted: 04/04/2003
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 9157Post Garrett Gilchrist »

That's a shame. So many final choices left unattended to.
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 9803Post Garrett Gilchrist »

My favorite VHS restorations I've done, like this one, are often the ones where the source tape was in very, very bad shape. It was a hailstorm of noise and static, the colors were all wrong, and weren't even attached to the picture. Wish I had the source tape here to compare now. It's nice to know that noise reduction, color correction and so on will have a real effect. I could have spent more time fixing spots where the color drops out entirely.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE0Tx4b3PP8

What I've done for some restorations where the color drops out intermittently (Within the Woods and East of the Moon come to mind) is prepare an alternate edit designed for the color layer only, where some frames are held a little longer or Photoshopped to cover color that would otherwise be missing. I didn't do that here but could have.
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 10487Post Garrett Gilchrist »

Ted Ives asks, as a comment on my Mr. Apollo restoration:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-mol9ONK4c
Garret I read all your stuff on GitHub; one thing not clear to me....obviously the sun should be yellow and Neil's hat should match other videos, i.e, green with a purple headband....but did you in any way seed these colors by hand? Or is the software able to somehow extract/propose colors from the black and white information?

I ask because there's a classic MIT video I cannot find now where a physicist shows a slide of a package of Lifesaver candy; then he filters it through a red filter, and makes a separate projection via a filter that makes everything gray. Then he combines the red and the gray versions by aiming the projectors until they merge on the screen....and blue, yellow, and green show up. It's like the information was still there. He asked the students "does anyone know why this happens". They offered several theories, he said, no....no...then ended with "no one understands this, it's an effect that's never been explained". I feel like this is all related.

Found a slightly different version of the demonstration I mentioned, it's the "Edwin Land Demonstration" this professor does, 10 minutes into this video...pretty mind blowing:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1t0egTZY44

I've never posted on GitHub Ted, and this is not a colorization. I did colorize three Bonzo Dog videos (Metaphorically Speaking, Jollity Farm and Beautiful Zelda) but this is not one of them. This exists in color but in low quality. I carefully restored the footage to make it more watchable in higher quality with less glitches.

I did watch the video you linked. The professor is doing a bad job of explaining it, but it is traditional for color film, and any image you see on your computer screen or your TV screen or in Photoshop, to be made up of three black and white images which have been filtered to only Red, Green and Blue channels (or Red, Green and Blue light). These are combined into one image, but checking the Channels Tab in Photoshop will show the three black and white images being combined. I explain this in my colorization tutorial on my other (main) channel as Garrett Gilchrist, and use this property to create black and white mattes in the third video.

In some of my recent colorizations (Cat Food, Beautiful Zelda and Jollity Farm) I have actually separated the red, green and blue channels of the image somewhat, offsetting the red and blue channels by one frame and overlaying that at 50% opacity or so. This means that the color seems to trail itself strangely as it moves, giving it a mild rainbow effect which imitates a low quality video camera. I do this because it makes the color and luminance of the image seem more connected to one another, and behave in a more unexpected manner.

In this case (of the video you linked), the professor is using only a grey image and a red image as light, but the effect is still similar. It's not quite full color though, as the blue and green light are the same image in this demonstration, when they should be different.

Indeed, some early films were shot with Two Strip color rather than Three Strip Technicolor, and therefore look similar, because they're only able to show reds and blues rather than a full spectrum.

Some black and white film of 60s-70s UK TV series will still contain some color information embedded as a series of tiny dot patterns on the surface of the image, although this has nothing to do with my work. (See chroma dot recovery.) US TV standards handled color differently and do not contain these dots.

As for my colorizations, I discuss this in my tutorial on my main channel, but I started with a raw AI colorization done using DeOldify software (by Jason Antic) to at least give me a starting point with the flesh tones and everything else, but I also made my own choices about what colors things should be and colored hundreds of keyframes by hand in Photoshop, which were then used to generate the rest of the frames in EBSynth and Deepremaster.

However, this video of Mr. Apollo is not a colorization, it's a restoration of a video that was already in color, but damaged. I removed much of that damage to make it more watchable.
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 10568Post Garrett Gilchrist »

The Super Mario Bros 1993 movie. Extended rough cut. Deleted and extended shots.

Restored with commentary by filmmaker Garrett Gilchrist
(Jim Henson Rarities, The Thief and the Cobbler Recobbled Cut, Shamelessly She-Hulk).

Now premiering on Youtube. Learn about my restoration process!
https://youtu.be/d-4yy9oBKN4

With Bob Hoskins, John Leguizamo, Samantha Mathis and Dennis Hopper.

https://lostmediaarchive.fandom.com/wik ... ed_Scenes)

https://twitter.com/smbmovie/status/1234941046452191232
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 10569Post Garrett Gilchrist »

Filmmaker Rory Frederick Joscelyne consulted on my Super Mario Bros 1993 deleted scenes restoration, and has been inspired to do his own restoration of sections of 1992-1998 TV series Gamesmaster, originally filmed as SD video. He is using Remini and Topaz and other methods I'd used on the Super Mario Bros restoration, and I am speaking with him now to consult with him on my other methods. (EBSynth mainly! Don't forget EBSynth!)

https://www.cyberpunkstudios.co.uk/gamesmaster
http://www.bookofthedead.ws/gamesmaster ... 266&p=1051

He worries here about noise reduction making the material seem "plastic." I assure you that when working with SD video but especially low quality SD video, there's no film grain that you'd actually want to preserve - you get more apparent detail by temporal noise reducing - it picks up details not present in the raw half-frame but obvious across the scene itself.

I wish the material was high quality enough that you'd actually need to worry about losing "grain" but it's really just noise. I always check what I'm doing when applying Neatvideo temporal noise reduction, and the result is always much more detailed than the original.

The SMB transfer appears to be filmed off of a monitor and goes in and out of focus on every frame, so I was trying to catch that in the cutdown to 24p. There wasn't detail there to lose, unfortunately. If your source is a commercial DVD of a master tape that's a different situation, but the grain you're seeing is still basically noise and macroblocking, especially at 50 or 60 fps.

I don't usually post the non-noise reduced versions of things, and it's not something that shows up super well on Youtube anyway, but it's often the most important step in the process, and the easiest.

It's rare that I actually post comparisons, but here's one:
https://twitter.com/TygerbugGarrett/sta ... 2168129536
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 10624Post Garrett Gilchrist »

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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 10741Post Garrett Gilchrist »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZYRg6bOCAE

This restoration is based on my methods ... very ambitious.
Rory Frederick Joscelyne does good work.
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