Animation Thread

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11214Post Garrett Gilchrist »

20/20 on Buster and Babs Go Hawaiian:
https://youtu.be/5W-J2wq2DkA
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11220Post Garrett Gilchrist »

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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11269Post Garrett Gilchrist »

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6f1ylk
https://www.rowsdowr.com/2016/06/07/rar ... tap-short/

A good, on-model comic version of an unmade Simpsons minisode, "Nazis on Tap."

"Bart the Daredevil" was originally too short to air, so Al Jean, Mike Reiss and the staff wrote this parody short. It was probably recorded as a joke to violate all of Matt Groening's rules about the show not getting too "cartoony" in a 40s Tex Avery/Looney Tunes kind of way.

Of course, Matt Groening thought the piece was too weird and nixed it, thinking it was too early in the series to present something so offbeat to the audience.

Some of the dialogue here is transcribed incorrectly. "Catching Hitler was neato" is garbled to "Gee, Hitler was neato", and "Uber hearing" becomes "Hoover hearing." It's also done in Simpsons comic format, rather than storyboard format.

It probably would have had wacky, off-model animation, although maybe just in terms of its movement, which a comic won't convey.

By Phil Ortiz, who worked on both the show and comic. The 4-page comic was drawn for WizardWorld Philadelphia in 2016.

Audio was released online by storyboard artist John Mathot in 2006. And me.
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11299Post Garrett Gilchrist »

Hey Boo-Boo! Yogi Bear debuted as a character 63 years ago! Kids who grew up with him are senior citizens and no longer the target audience for this show! If you think that a funny cartoon starring Yogi Bear should look and feel exactly the same now as it did in 1958, and appeal to the exact same audience, you're wrong! The fact that this looks like a goofy comedy show is a good thing, as it suggests the creators have put some thought into amusing themselves, rather than just reproducing zombie versions of 60+ year old characters! Hey Boo-Boo! If you want shows that look like the 50s-60s Yogi and Huckleberry Hound, those shows already exist! Let's go get that pic-a-nic-basket!

https://variety.com/2021/tv/news/yogi-b ... 235030440/

(It actually does bother me a little that cartoons now tend to look like their own storyboards, with all the quirks of a digital storyboarding doodle, but I doubt it bothers the target audience.)
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11366Post Garrett Gilchrist »

Thinking about the Chris Latta Mr. Burns from season 1 of The Simpsons. (And, very briefly, Moe.)
https://youtu.be/Xszdkzpzqrc?t=76
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11436Post Garrett Gilchrist »

https://www.awn.com/animationworld/serg ... iece-klaus

https://vimeo.com/364741498

A superlative film. A one of a kind technical achievement, and also very much in line with Disney films like Treasure Planet, The Emperor's New Groove and Tarzan ... exactly the sort of films we miss, that they don't make anymore. Well, this time "they" did.

It's also a good story well told - the story of an unusual friendship that becomes a legend. I'm not sure what younger audiences will make of it, but it sure seems like ideal holiday viewing.
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11442Post Garrett Gilchrist »

Winnie the Pooh is now in the public domain.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ah59LFBxMBI

Repost from 2018 (with some links that are broken now):

Walt Disney's version of Winnie the Pooh was nearly the last thing he did as producer, and is a merchandise goldmine for the company. He's the subject of over a half-dozen features and several TV series.

There were earlier efforts to adapt and exploit Winnie the Pooh and friends, which present certain mysteries and oddities. Pooh was a familiar merchandising success well before Disney.

First though, Tigger and Piglet didn't appear in the first Disney Winnie the Pooh short in 1966. The vinyl record of "Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree" features prototype designs for both, based on the book designs. A big difference for Tigger. The new character of Gopher was considered as a Piglet replacement.

http://cartoonresearch.com/wp-content/u ... ck-600.jpg
https://images.bonanzastatic.com/afu/im ... -l1600.jpg

The vinyl record features scenes and lyrics not in the animated short.

The short's poster also features the book-accurate Tigger and Piglet:
https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-winni ... 96607.html
https://www.christies.com/img/LotImages ... _tree).jpg

Winnie the Pooh was planned as a feature, before Walt decided to split it up into three shorts instead. He passed away before the second short was completed.

The three shorts and a new segment were released as a feature, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, in 1977. Disney has continued the franchise since and it's one of their biggest earners. Possibly their most merchandised property.

In 1960 NBC aired a "Shirley Temple's Storybook" special starring Bil Baird's marionettes. Faz Fazakas, later a technical creator for The Muppets, played Winnie the Pooh. Bil Baird's company later performed this show onstage. (Possibly with the same script, probably with the same puppets, plus Olga Felgemacher as a puppet Christopher Robin.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlpER1R1AB8

The Shirley Temple special is available on DVD. The puppets resemble the Shepard illustrations, and therefore resemble when Disney attempts a "realistic" take on the characters, as in Christopher Robin and some merchandise.

Walt Disney acquired the rights soon after (he'd been trying since 1937). I might assume that the Shirley Temple special was made because Stephen Slesinger and company were losing the rights to Disney, and NBC would soon be airing the Disneyland TV show anyway.

There's also the matter of the Russian animated Winnie the Pooh films by Fyodor Khitruk and Gennadiy Sokolskiy (1969-1972)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wcg2aHT3Bw

NBC apparently aired a Christopher Robin special in 1947 which I assume is lost. Segments of Pooh, possibly three minutes long, were produced by Stephen Slesinger for "Telecomics Presents." These featured narration over still illustrations, intended to resemble newspaper comics and featuring characters like Red Ryder (of BB gun fame) and Tailspin Tommy. Slesinger produced radio broadcasts, dolls, board games, books, records and other merchandise of Pooh until his death in 1953. As an artist Slesinger introduced Pooh's red shirt, which survives into the Disney version. He turned Pooh into a $50 million dollar business.

https://pictures.abebooks.com/BABYLONRE ... 991960.jpg

Slesinger's estate turned rights to Pooh over to Disney in 1961, but later insisted that they had retained some rights to the property, resulting in lawsuits over the years. This was dismissed by a judge in 2012, here:

https://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-federal- ... 19015.html

Confusingly, there was another company called Telecomics at the same time, founded in 1942 by Disney animators Dick Moores and Jack Boyd, with a pilot created in 1945. Two TV series called Telecomics, confused for one another in every source I consulted - either of which could be the first animated series ever made for television, if they had any animation in them at the time.

I have even seen the Slesinger family names on mid-1970s copyright renewals for the "other" Telecomics so it's hard to be sure. It's logical that's an error (on their part or otherwise) but sources are contradictory.

Michael Barrier, Harry McCracken, and Mark Kausler discuss this Telecomics here --

http://www.michaelbarrier.com/WhatsNewA ... lercomment

... and there are three examples at Youtube. "Kid Champion," "Space Barton" and "Danny March," adventure stories of three and a half minutes each, which add up to a fifteen minute program. There is almost no moving animation and it seems to be a later episode, found at a garage sale. Probably from late 1950.

The original show contained “Brother Goose” by Cal Howard; “Joey and Jug”, a clown story by Arnold Gillespie; “Rick Rack Secret Agent,” a Dick Tracy copy by Miles Pike and Pete Burness, and “Sa-Lah,” an Arabian Knights fantasy drawn by A.J. Metcalf. Jack Kirkwood, Lilien Leigh and Bill Grey provided the voice-over narration. NBC aired the segments as "NBC Comics."

http://tralfaz.blogspot.com/2012/03/nbc ... art-1.html
http://tralfaz.blogspot.com/2012/03/nbc ... art-2.html
https://profilesinhistory.com/wp-conten ... ion90s.pdf
http://tag.rubberslug.com/gallery/maste ... 389&Page=1

https://d23.com/winnie-the-pooh-and-the ... a638ba9da1


Danny Horn writes:
I just wrote a Wikipedia article about the 1949-1951 Telecomics / NBC Comics television shows, and I figured out that pretty much everyone who's ever written about it has the story mixed up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecomics

During my research, I found some forum posts that you wrote a couple years ago that said you think they're two separate shows. I figured out that it's actually three. :) The smoking gun was an article in a Pasadena newspaper about the people who made the second show complaining that they hadn't been picked up, after the first show had already aired.

https://www.newspapers.com/image/619461483/

So I'm really curious what you think -- did I get the story right, or is there something that I missed?
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11580Post Garrett Gilchrist »

Bob's Burgers (The Movie): So technically this is a 2D animated feature musical being released by Disney. With that technicality aside, the Belcher family are as funny on the big screen as they are on network television ... which is to say this is decent enough, acceptable summertime comedy fare. Some upgrades have been made for the big screen. There's some CGI, and they get a little fancy with camera angles and basic shading, but it mainly shows in more expressive animation in, say, sequences of the cast dancing. That includes an end-credits montage with characters who otherwise barely appear in the film. There are songs, which are catchy and hummable enough, even if the cast are all popular comedy actors who don't have Broadway singing chops. Later on, David Wain gets a spotlight moment which is purposely vocally strange.

The plot also feels bigger, but retains the small-scale charm of the series. A sinkhole opens in front of the struggling restaurant, putting the future of the family in jeopardy. This also uncovers a six-year-old murder mystery. Kevin Kline's Calvin Fischoeder is arrested, apparently with good reason. With their landlord in trouble, the family seems sure to lose their restaurant, and young Louise Belcher (Kristen Schaal) is determined to solve the mystery, and to prove herself after being called a "baby" at school.

The cast is again led by H. Jon Benjamin, John Roberts, Dan Mintz and Eugene Mirman. Loren Bouchard is creator, co-writer and co-director. David Wain, Zach Galifianakis, Larry Murphy, Gary Cole and David Herman also feature. Jay Johnston is absent as Jimmy Pesto Sr., after his involvement in the attempted coup of January 6 2021.

Bob's Burgers has been chugging along on FOX television since 2011, following a much cruder pilot where the twist was that the family were cannibals serving human meat. The series dropped that angle, focusing on the likeable Belcher family - the exasperated Bob and spirited Linda, and their children - the awkwardly romantic Tina, musical Gene and rebellious Louise. The series has much of the charm of early episodes of The Simpsons, and the believability of King of the Hill, with a little more wackiness involved. The show is also curiously LGBT-coded for a FOX show about a traditional sitcom family, which may have been accidental, at first. Lead female characters are played by men and the male characters are often of ambiguous or flexible sexuality. This is usually not stated outright.

Like so many adult animated series, the show was pitched with somewhat crude drawings, designed to look cheap for penny-pinching executives. Then there's nothing cheap about the final result. The movie takes this farther, with full animation throughout. We've seen this play out before with The Simpsons and Rick and Morty and other series. There are also now other series that look exactly like Bob's Burgers, and Rick and Morty. The animators deserve credit for putting extra effort into the believable motion of these characters here. They deserve credit, but some of them won't get it - some of the outsourced animation is only credited with the name of the studio. As with the series, Bento Box Animation in L.A. handles the most important production here.

The results are reasonably funny, and it feels larger in scale than an episode of the TV series, without being much different from one, in terms of what it's presenting here. It doesn't change things up so much that this would be unrecognizable as a series episode or three. (They don't, for example, go to France or something.) The family goes through a lot together, with some emotional moments by the end, and Louise's journey as a character here feels earned. You could show this to someone unfamiliar with the series, and it would be a representative example of what the series does.

Much like a hamburger, Bob's Burgers is predictably what you probably want this summer, and if you like this sort of thing, this is the sort of thing you like.
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 11592Post Garrett Gilchrist »

My working theory is that it doesn't actually save money to have these adult animated shows look as bad as they do, because they're still fully animated in any way that matters. It's just that execs think it looks cheap, and greenlight it.

I don't actually think that most of them look bad, as a final result. I think they purposely choose naive art styles, and then fully animate them. It's so strange, and makes it clear that any art style could be used here, rather than imitating a previously successful show.

See also: any kid's show which looks like how twenty-five-year-olds draw rough storyboard thumbnails



William 🌹 Kuechenberg replies:
I think it’s sometimes a conscious decision. In GO TEAM VENTURE they mention how so many other shows were looking shitty on purpose to be funny or edgy or ironic, and they decided to make THE VENTURE BROS look so damn good as kind of a reaction against that.
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