Comics Thread

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Comics Thread

Post: # 9740Post Garrett Gilchrist
Mon Nov 12, 2018 3:50 pm

“From time to time we receive letters from readers who wonder why there’s so much moralizing in our mags. They take great pains to point out that comics are supposed to be escapist reading, and nothing more. But somehow, I can’t see it that way. It seems to me that a story without a message, however subliminal, is like a man without a soul. In fact, even the most escapist literature of all – old time fairy tales and heroic legends – contained moral and philosophical points of view.
At every college campus where I may speak there’s as much discussion of war and peace, civil rights, and the so-called youth rebellion as there is of our Marvel mags per se. None of us lives in a vacuum – none of us is untouched by the everyday events about us – events which shape our stories just as they shape our lives. Sure our tales can be called escapist – but just because something’s for fun, doesn’t mean we have to blanket our brains while we read it! Excelsior!” – Stan Lee

Stan Lee's writing gave Marvel Comics its personality, even well into the 1990s when he still wrote "Stan's Soapbox" columns and addressed readers with phrases like "true believers" and "excelsior!" To an extent the man WAS Marvel comics and had a hand in creating countless beloved characters. He injected a little bit of reality into the comic book world, giving us heroes who struggled with real-world problems, at a time when DC was still more fantasy-based. At age 95 he'd seen Marvel characters take over the Hollywood box office and largely overtake their DC rivals to become some of the most popular heroes in the world. He himself appeared in every film, and even non-Marvel films like Mallrats and Teen Titans Go! to the Movies. Because why make a comic book movie without Stan Lee?

(I met Stan Lee once in 2007, and told him I'd made a film about one of his characters, She-Hulk. I don't have more of a story than that.)

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Comics Thread

Post: # 9741Post Garrett Gilchrist
Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:16 pm

Here's Stan Lee making fun of Rob Liefeld & Todd Mcfarlane in the 90s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmLFGWAyajU


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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Comics Thread

Post: # 9949Post Garrett Gilchrist
Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:40 pm

For some reason, Marvel spent 1993 using Squirrel Girl as a punchline. She was introduced in 1991 as a one-off character, but maybe they were getting mail asking when she was coming back, or she'd become a weird inside joke around the office.

From the last issue of ALF:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D2rIO2eU4AcqWdJ.jpg

https://www.cbr.com/squirrel-girl-marvel-making-fun/

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Comics Thread

Post: # 9962Post Garrett Gilchrist
Mon Apr 08, 2019 8:37 pm

In the 40s, Captain Marvel was about as popular as Superman, hung out with a talking tiger named Mr. Tawny, is a child whose superhero "family" also includes a disabled child, was nicknamed "The Big Red Cheese" and resembled Fred MacMurray. He's referenced in the first Spider-Man movie.

Eventually he wound up in DC's lineup - but they already had a Superman, and using the name "Captain Marvel" gradually became legally difficult due to the success of Stan Lee's Marvel Comics. He's now usually called "Shazam" (originally the wizard who gives him his powers) and drawn with a tailored, flapped costume different from Superman's, which the movie ignores.

Stan Lee's Marvel Comics then created various characters called "Captain Marvel" in order to make use of the name. (Such as Mar-Vell and Monica Rambeau, who only sort of appear in the Captain Marvel movie.)

The one that really stuck recently was Carol Danvers, formerly Ms. Marvel (and once a supporting character to Captain Marvel). It was a sort of promotion for her, as she was already a semi-popular character. Previously, Rogue (of the X-Men) stole Ms. Marvel's powers in a fight and kept them permanently, and Ms. Marvel as a character had a rough time of it for awhile.

The role of "Ms. Marvel" is now filled by a young Muslim woman with stretching powers, Kamala Khan.

"Carol Danvers" sounds very similar to Supergirl's current name "Kara Danvers." This is an apparent accident caused by combining two of Supergirl's usual names - Linda Lee Danvers and Kara Zor-El (A name also used by alternate Supergirl, Power Girl).

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