Animation Thread

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 9966Post Garrett Gilchrist
Thu Apr 11, 2019 6:36 am

Drawn animation!
What a wonderful phrase!
Drawn animation!
Ain't no passing craze!
We'll be watching these movies
til the end of our days
But execs refuse
To make any new
Drawn animation!

When he was a young filmgoer
When I was a young filmgoer!
I found that animation had a certain appeal
That just isn't there when you make it look real
I appreciate art, and I think it's strange
That they just gave up after Home On the Range!
Realistic is bland
The execs don't understand!
Cos they don't respect artists
They want jokes about farting
(You know, for the kids)

Drawn animation!
What a wonderful phrase!
Drawn animation!
Ain't no passing craze!
We'll be watching these movies
til the end of our days
But execs refuse
To make any new
Drawn animation!

https://twitter.com/LightsCameraPod/sta ... 3810674688


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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 10042Post Garrett Gilchrist
Fri Jul 19, 2019 4:50 pm

AniMat has been doing a series of Youtube videos about The Thief and the Cobbler. I didn't look at the script for these until he was basically done, but we decided that I'd do an interview for him to correct a few serious misconceptions I'd noticed, or that usually come up when talking about the film. I think that mostly got cut out of his shorter version, since I recorded a whole hour of stuff.

"Now that I have officially finished Animation Lookback: The Thief and the Cobbler, how about we take the time to chat with the man who introduced the movie to a new generation with his well-known Recobbled Cut. Enjoy this special interview with Garrett Gilchrist!"
https://youtu.be/BwHmcVOwfW0
Also, if you’d like to check out the complete hour-long talk, then you can see that interview here:"
https://youtu.be/iL0dYjbt5q8

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 10081Post Garrett Gilchrist
Tue Aug 20, 2019 1:43 pm

There's an episode of 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo where they're in a comic strip, and Platypus Duck shows up, an early student-film character by Tiny Toons/Animaniacs producer Tom Ruegger (Animaniacs would have originally starred similar characters).

He sounds like Wade Duck from Garfield and Friends and mostly sings his own theme song, which is identical to the Grape Ape theme song.

It's also very close, if not identical, to the later Slappy Squirrel theme song.

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6d13xu

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 10083Post Garrett Gilchrist
Tue Aug 20, 2019 2:46 pm

Rebooting He-Man while She-Ra is still on the air is like starting your dessert without finishing your meal first.

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 10134Post Garrett Gilchrist
Sun Aug 25, 2019 6:50 pm

"Broadcast Nuisance" ... An Animaniacs cartoon which was heavily censored in the US, and rewritten/redubbed. Is this uncut on overseas DVDs? I did a partial restoration at some point based on an overseas Boomerang airing, and it's supposed to be uncut in Italy, including Slappy's scene. These clips don't cover the entire cartoon of course, with "Slam Fondlesome" name intact. Always meant to figure out sources on this and whether it's even been released intact ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXXhZ2Rz2dQ

https://youtu.be/quR9a7y3P2w

https://youtu.be/icwtnAE7bv4

The rewritten dialogue in the heavily-censored version is sort of an improvement at times, but it's all designed to make the Warners seem less like they're doing this on purpose because they want to.



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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 10201Post Garrett Gilchrist
Tue Sep 10, 2019 1:00 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ1FCAXb8ZU

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic has ended with season 9, episodes 24-26. It's over an hour long and structured so that the Ponies save Equestria once more in a two-part episode, and then there's an epilogue which takes us forward several decades.

It's a special ending to a special series. It might even be controversial. As Youtuber Jenny Nicholson put it: "I'm haunted by the My Little Pony finale- I can't believe they're mortal and ravaged by the years and going to die."

I hadn't watched this series in four or five seasons. I watched most or all of the first four seasons of the show, and a couple of the Equestria Girls movies - a spinoff featuring human versions of the characters and a more awkward art style.

I didn't watch more than a couple episodes of season 5 and nothing beyond that.

The series caused an internet sensation when it first came out in October 2010. The franchise was known as a way to sell toys to young girls, and had few male or adult fans. Young guys seem to have started watching it ironically as a gag, but discovered a show with unusual depth. Lauren Faust (currently showrunner on DC's Superhero Girls) created a truly brilliant series. Light and accessible enough for its young target audience and deep enough for older viewers. It was genuinely funny and dramatic, and even subversive when audiences weren't expecting anything more challenging than a toy commercial.

Lauren Faust had tried to sell Hasbro a series based on her characters "Milky Way and the Galaxy Girls," but instead folded most of her ideas and characters for that series into the My Little Pony format. Her characters were vibrant and funny, suitable to both sitcom-style comedy and action-hero adventure.

The songs by Daniel Ingram and company were also extremely catchy and memorable, and quickly attracted a fanbase of their own.

It showed that a "girl's cartoon" designed to sell toys could be just as much fun as its male counterparts, or indeed more so. It was certainly an influential series, laying the groundwork for other smart, all-ages reboots like "She-Ra and the Princesses of Power" and "Ducktales" (as well as lesser for-kids-only shows like Care Bears).

It was also controversial. The show quickly attracted a loud, male fanbase of "Bronies." The internet at large saw young men obsessed with a show for little girls and dismissed them as dangerous, embarrassing creeps. Indeed, some of them had come from the darker, more anonymous corners of the internet and the fanbase always had a dark side it was never quite able to shed. For many young men, though, this was a way to get over the childish idea that something "girly" meant something "bad." It was a way to challenge gender roles and figure out who they were exactly, with many coming out as trans or non-binary, or at least not interested in "toxic masculinity" and the stereotypical gender roles of the past.

The show was also, of course, a gift for My Little Pony's female fans of all ages. Many women who loved My Little Pony in the 80s found themselves collecting the toys again in the 2010s.

As for Lauren Faust, she found that her ideas were constrained by Hasbro's need to sell toys based on the series. Stressed out and losing creative control, she left the series after season 1 had aired, although her fingerprints are still all over season 2.

While the series is still very much Lauren Faust's My Little Pony, other hands were in charge for the rest of its run at DHX Studios in Vancouver. Very capably so, but the influence of the "Brony" fanbase changed the show's tone to be more palatable to a male audience. More male characters were introduced, as well as more pop culture humor, and the fanbase's habit of freeze-framing crowd scenes turned minor background characters into stars.

A feature film was released in 2017, with a different art style than used in the series. A special in that style, "Rainbow Roadtrip," was released in 2019. There were also about eleven "Equestria Girls" projects featuring alternate-universe humanoid versions of the characters, as human teenagers attending high school.

I loved the series early on, and have a great deal of respect for the entire cast and crew. It was a dose of pure happiness in animated form. I found that feeling diluted a little over time but it's still a great achievement as a series.

From 2011 to early 2013 I spent some time learning to draw the characters in a show-accurate style. I hoped to be hired to do official merchandise. That only happened a couple of times in the end (such as a WeLoveFine T-shirt), although I hear that a collab poster I drew ten characters for was hanging in DHX Studios during the whole run of production.

Lauren Faust's art style is very different to my own, but drawing in the DHX style was certainly an influence on how I still do things now.

You can argue whether the fandom as a whole was a positive or a negative. It certainly had a toxic side, as all fandoms do, and that may have overwhelmed its positive aspects in the end.

Having left behind most of my interest in the series, I approached the finale with mixed feelings.

I'll admit I didn't have a clue who all the new characters were in the opening. The show had already promoted its main characters to teachers, introduced some new youngsters, brought in lots of creatures who aren't ponies, and thrown in some new villains, often borrowed from the 80s show. That opening is overcomplicated now, stuffed with characters.

There are now dragons, changelings, Yaks, Griffons, Hippogriffs, Sea Ponies and other creatures everywhere, including a group of six diverse youngsters introduced the previous season.

The series doesn't seem to have gone downhill in its nine years. The finale is entirely up to standard, showing a pretty standard plotline where our heroes take on three villains and attempt to save Equestria.

This results in a reference to Pinky and the Brain ...

https://youtu.be/XQ1FCAXb8ZU?t=2015

As well as some unusually good acting from Tara Strong as Twilight Sparkle.

And for all the fans who've been freeze-framing to notice the background characters for nine seasons, Lyra (Heartstrings in merchandise) and Bon Bon (Sweetie Drops in merchandise) have gotten gay married. These were background characters that the fans liked, and the production crew adopted their ideas as canon. Their wedding announcement uses the fan names.

https://twitter.com/caroramsey/status/1 ... 2060028928

That's even true for a pony the fans decided was Doctor Who, and his friend Roseluck.

Actually if you're going to watch these episodes, it might not be a good idea to read further, as there will be spoilers.

While only the main characters actually have much to do in these episodes, pretty much every single possible character shows up at some point, and the show often attempts to resolve their stories in some way.

Twilight Sparkle takes over for Princesses Celestia and Luna, who retire. There is a time jump of two or three decades for the final episode, where Twilight is now dealing with a problem student who reminds Twilight of her younger self.

It's a little bit haunting to see the My Little Pony characters depicted as middle-aged, somewhere in their forties or fifties. Twilight is all but immortal now, so the implications are bittersweet. It's not hard to do the math and notice which characters and pets have passed away in the intervening decades. At least there are lots of children around to continue the family line.

There are a few extra lines on the ponies' faces and Rarity's hair is now streaked with grey. They only see each other once every moon. But the friends are still friends, and are here to teach young Luster Dawn why that's important.

It all gets a little too real, which feels appropriate for a show which always kept things just a little bit more real than expected throughout its run. It's possible that the show actually taught its viewers something about friendship. It certainly introduced a lot of memorable characters and gave a lot of laughs along the way.

As we end the series, it seems that Applejack and Rainbow Dash (Ashleigh Ball) are living together and very close. Speculate as you like. Discord, the near-immortal chaos demon played by Star Trek's John DeLancie, has been living with Fluttershy, who is not immortal and is the only one keeping him on the side of good. Pinkie Pie has married and had children with "Weird Al" Yankovic. I am not making this up. She also becomes a chaos demon briefly in the previous episode.

There's a lot of reveals like this, done casually.

Though they don't speak, we see all the child characters have grown up after the time jump, including the Cutie Mark Crusaders. Any fan of the show will be freeze-framing a lot, even if you haven't watched in years. You'll catch Derpy / Muffins making her deliveries. We get one final song from Daniel Ingram and company, and the main characters walk by to reveal artwork of all the minor characters from the whole run of the show.

It's a pleasant, and still somewhat challenging episode, which shows that the show goes out the same way it began - by always delivering more interesting character work than expected, and being true to its basic moral about the magic of friendship.

It will probably turn out, in the end, that this show inspired a lot of people in the animation industry, and did a lot to change kids' television. I wonder if it will be given that credit, or if we'll all just keep being emabarrased by certain Bronies.

Fine work as usual, DHX Media Vancouver. My best wishes to you on your future projects.

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Re: Animation Thread

Post: # 10202Post RaggedyMan
Tue Sep 10, 2019 8:49 pm

Were the last few episodes leaked or something? I thought they hadn't aired yet.

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