Movie Thread: The Dissection Room

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Movie Thread: The Dissection Room

Post: # 9972Post Garrett Gilchrist
Sat Apr 13, 2019 3:41 am

Marvel's trailers have changed scenes to avoid spoilers and better show the film's concept. Infinity War showed Hulk in the Wakanda battle (rather than the Hulkbuster armor), and its trailers were often mostly unique versions of shots. Thor's eye, Rocket and Groot leaving the Guardians, Tony's armor in New York and the Iron Spider-Man costume were all handled misleadingly in the trailers thanks to digital effects, and we saw different takes with finished FX. Homecoming had a shot of Spider-Man and Iron Man together in New York and Captain Marvel wasn't holding a Fonzie lunchbox in her big moment.

Avengers Endgame isn't out yet, but I've already spotted one of these. Thor sizes up Captain Marvel, holds his hand out to grab his weapon and says "I like this one." But which weapon? Mjolnir the hammer or Stormbreaker the axe? Depending on which version of the clip you're seeing, Marvel has shown us both.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OqXq69vEsk

(Note: the final film uses Stormbreaker.)

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Re: Movie Thread: The Dissection Room

Post: # 9989Post Garrett Gilchrist
Wed Apr 24, 2019 12:48 am

Avengers Endgame: After 11 years and 22 movies (59 hours), plus several TV series, the most successful adventure film franchise in history takes a well deserved extended bow, in a grand finale which makes sure to please fans of every single film they've made up to this point. It's also difficult to talk about the film even in vague terms without spoiling it somewhat, so be warned.

This isn't the end for Marvel at the movies, but it is the endgame for the original Avengers lineup. The most famous shot from Marvel's The Avengers (2012) spun around the team in a circle, showing six Marvel heroes together. It was a treat for comics fans, and it's referenced again here, but after 22 films the team is much larger now, and the scope of this film is exponentially larger. It's remarkable that the film works as well as it does, coming across as a celebratory victory lap through the series' greatest hits. It's a whole lot of movie, that delivers what fans of these movies want. At times every scene seems to bring a new surprise appearance, or pay off something established in previous films. With so many characters to include, directors the Russo Brothers could have easily dropped the ball, but almost everyone gets a moment to shine. It's bigger than any superhero film ever made, by quite a ways.

Perhaps Thanos, our villain, agreed that this series has too many characters, as he famously wiped out half the population of the universe at the end of Avengers Infinity War. The original six survived Thanos' snap, but at a terrible cost, and when we see our heroes again they aren't at their best, and we spend a good chunk of this film's runtime mourning. It's a smaller and damaged team. The most common poster has twelve heroes on it, and the film is really about them, the ones who survived the snap, and their efforts to move on. It's not about the heroes killed in the snap, like Black Panther, Spider-Man and the Guardians of the Galaxy. And for much for the film's first half, the movie seems to be in no particular hurry. This is a deft sleight of hand by the filmmakers, since at many points the film is cut like a trailer, trying to get through its massive amount of story as quickly and cleanly as possible. It's a credit to the film's quality that it feels like it's taking its time, especially early on. Scenes actually manage a slow and casual tone, exploring how these characters deal with the trauma of losing so many people they loved. The slower scenes early on, and the weight of all the previous films, keep us invested in the characters so that the film can get away with having tons of stuff happening all at once by the film's end.

Since the Marvel Cinematic Universe began with Iron Man in 2009, the strength of these films has been that they're really character studies, balancing slow-paced dialogue scenes with big-budget CGI action. Tony Stark has always been defined by his post traumatic stress disorder, and his arrogance, and how he fights through both to do the right thing. Thor has been defined by trying, and sometimes failing, to live up to what's expected of him as the son of a God and a King. Natasha Romanoff regrets her past as a killer and spends her time as an Avenger trying to make up for it. And the Guardians of the Galaxy films are often about overcoming trauma from abusive parents to find a family made up of friends. There is a recurring theme in Endgame about parenting, which feels natural at this late point in the series. Only Rocket and Nebula survived the snap, and this film wisely gives Karen Gillan a major role, trying to avenge and undo the actions of her abusive father Thanos.

What the film drives home is that some things can't be undone. Despite the fantastic events of these films, there are real consequences here, and not everyone will be making it out alive. This gets tricky after so many comic book based films, where it starts to seem like anything could happen. But the film attempts to set the rules of its game early on, and it sticks to them. It is consistent, and that matters. It's an all out war and its events matter, about as much as they possibly could, under the circumstances.

The events of the previous films matter too, and Endgame constantly rewards the viewer for having watched the previous Marvel movies, and even the TV series (though just one character). You'll see characters you didn't expect to see again. Lots of big stars and familiar faces turn up, often just to stand in the background and do very little. It's a reminder of just how much these movies have accomplished with their characters, as if they've spent 11 years building the world's most impressive action figure collection. The film's final act comes at a fast pace, and relies on us already knowing who these characters are, since there's not much time to do much with them. What we do see, though, is entirely in character.

Brie Larson's Captain Marvel isn't around for much of the film, but she gets a girl-power moment that will have fans cheering. The weak spot is Jeremy Renner's Hawkeye, who has plenty to do here but just isn't that interesting, and seems psychotic. We don't see much of some characters like M'Baku or Wong. (I couldn't tell you if Wong even survived the snap.) Okoye is very underused, and a lot of characters only get cameos. But overall, it's remarkable how many characters this film finds time for, while keeping focus on the original Avengers team. The end credits roll over clips from the previous films, with special credits for the original six.

And there's plenty of humor and clever little moments that pay off what we've seen over the course of these films. Humor is just a given in these films at this point, despite the grim circumstances the Avengers are up against, and it wouldn't be much of a movie without it. The film could have had more humor - there are stretches where the film seems to avoid making jokes so that it can get through a whole lot of story faster. (Ant-Man's first scene looks like it had its jokes removed for pacing.) At other points the humor is subtle and relies on the established relationships between these characters. But some of the jokes are terrific, and a gift to the fans who've stuck by this franchise so long.

Someone said "it pays off like a slot machine." Another said "It makes you feel like you haven't wasted your time watching all the other movies."

There's never been a film franchise like this, and with Endgame they've stuck the landing to remind us of that. For kids of the early 80s, Star Wars was the big adventure franchise, and maybe Indiana Jones. Both series made three films and then called it a day, at least at the time. The Marvel Cinematic Universe has produced 22 films and various TV series over 11 years, with more coming. It's simply unprecedented in film history.

The success of Iron Man and Captain America has led to more and more hits. Black Panther, Captain Marvel, Spider-Man. Marvel's team has put an incredible amount of time, money and effort into making their heroes work on the big screen. They've made us like and love these characters, and Endgame is a stroll down memory lane that reminds you why. It's overstuffed with characters, but takes time to breathe and portray them properly, especially its twelve survivors. It's a huge film with small, personal stakes. It's what the Russo Brothers and Marvel do best, and for now it's a satisfying conclusion to the Avengers films. Not that Marvel has any intention of stopping, with a new Spider-Man film on the way and more after that. But Endgame is the big one, and for now they don't plan on trying to top it. I wonder how they even could.

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Re: Movie Thread: The Dissection Room

Post: # 9993Post Garrett Gilchrist
Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:59 am

Announced: Spider-Man: Far From Home, Black Widow, TV series of Hawkeye, Loki, Scarlet Witch & Vision, Falcon & Winter Soldier

After Endgame I have QUESTIONS ABOUT ALL OF THESE

HOW DO THEY FIT INTO CANON?

I've spoken to Ellie on Twitter, who has explained most of these to my satisfaction, showing how Marvel COULD make these work.

My guess is that the Spider-Man continuity will be explained with a quick speech by Martin Starr, of the "Welcome Back to Greendale" variety.


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Re: Movie Thread: The Dissection Room

Post: # 10000Post Garrett Gilchrist
Tue Apr 30, 2019 8:52 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvvZaBf9QQI

This is astoundingly bad. Everything to do with Sonic is wildly awful. I thought we were well past this era of video games being adapted by people who don't know, understand or care about them -- especially since the original Sonic fans are in their 40s now, or nearly so.

The one thing I like, in a vacuum, is the idea of doing a 90s Jim Carrey movie in 2019. He could be the saving grace here, like Raul Julia in Street Fighter, or Frank Langella in Masters of the Universe.

Ben Schwartz is also theoretically good casting for Sonic, and James Marsden deserves better.

This also comes right after a CGI-animated TV series, Sonic Boom, which was funny and self-aware, and what fans wanted.

We also had Tyson Hesse's charming 2D-animated shorts which promoted Sonic Mania and Team Sonic Racing. The Mania shorts brought back some of the Sonic 1 art style, and it's evolved from there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgbngiiwihM

The people who understand Sonic have done great animated work in the past few years, and then you get this ...

They also appear to have, unironically, adapted Sonic from this meme:
https://thenewswheel.com/wp-content/upl ... 601553.gif

I should also point out that Eggman / Dr. Ivo Robotnik is already a well-established comedic character without turning him into Jim Carrey ... He's been portrayed pretty much the same way in cartoons since the 90s ...

Meanwhile James Marsden's storyline is indistinguishable from the easter bunny movie "Hop" ...

It's being compared to the CGI Smurfs and Bay-TMNT here. This has reminded me of the course-correcting sequel "Smurfs: The Lost Village," where the Smurfs looked comic-accurate rather than horrifying.
https://twitter.com/CalisDraws/status/1 ... 6140856321


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