Video Restoration Thread

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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 11305Post Garrett Gilchrist »

This will only really matter to the actors who were in this, but

Youtube copies of this local Los Angeles/USC college sitcom are from VHS rips.

I too only have VHS of the actual episodes, but I shot and edited the (six different) title sequences for that season in 2003, so I've included those in higher quality, plus all the raw footage and clips I was able to find.

https://archive.org/details/god-help-us-season-2
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Garrett Gilchrist
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 11339Post Garrett Gilchrist »

It's one of those nights where I'm running into something which should be simple and straightforward, but turns out to be difficult and not supported in most software-

-that is, deinterlacing video Yadif-style on Mac OSX High Sierra.

Driving myself insane with this.

"I could just do a bob in Premiere CS6"

I don't want to do a bob in Premiere!

So I guess I'm back to using command-line ffmpeg. Which is always kind of a pain. I always feel I'm not taking advantage of its full functionality, since that's not laid out for you. You just type in a command.

Another option would be VirtualDub2 in Wine, maybe? VirtualDub1 is a big no.

Either that or I'll have to do it in VirtualDub2 on PC, which is very inconvenient.

I don't think VLC would deliver the sort of file I want- or Handbrake, which had similar functionality.

I want to do these processes on a Mac, running in the other room, rather than on this PC, which I'm on all day.

I used to have to use command-line ffmpeg on Mac to convert all my footage to ProRes for editing, among other things. So that won't be too unusual for me.

(My current PC setup can read most material natively and doesn't do ProRes. On PC, I've been stuck with the higher file sizes of Lagarith, especially if I don't want gamma problems. The conversion to Quicktime tended to take the Gama down several notches and crush blacks. Meanwhile the Mac doesn't do Lagarith so I can't go back and forth.)

Yadif (or better) deinterlacing is the sort of thing that more mainstream programs should have supported and don't.

Meanwhile, MiniDV frame rate conversions with Cinema Tools was very much Mac only with no real PC equivalent I'm aware of. (You can muck around with AviSynth and VirtualDub2 but it's rough.)
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 11343Post Garrett Gilchrist »

MiniDV-based digital editing technology first became popular between 1998 and 2001, and it's remarkable how fast it's become not only obsolete but very difficult to archive and work with on modern platforms. Although I upgraded to HD by 2016 at the latest, I was still using MiniDV tech as late as 2018, when my camera finally gave out. So this crept up on me. And I'm still using MiniDV and Digital8 tech, to archive all of my old material- hundreds of tapes in MiniDV, Digital8, Video8/Hi-8, VHS and cassette formats.

I've archived over 3 terabytes of material, at a rate of about 10-14 GB per hour.

I couldn't do this on my current computer. I had to effectively travel back in time. My old OSX computer, built in late 2010, was no longer working, and I asked the woman who built it originally to rebuild it and get it running again.

I have just now accessed some editing files from 2007, and have them running again in Final Cut Pro 7. They're off by a frame or two compared to the original, but otherwise it's all magically working again. This particular film was not one that went well for anyone involved, and I left my work somewhat unfinished, but it's of historical importance due to the people involved so I'm resurrecting it. I originally edited it in 29.97 fps and I need a 23.98 edit instead. It's taken a little work but I've already salvaged most of what I edited, in 23.98.

It's worth doing. Future-proofing my old work now, assuming these drives hold up.

I've been thinking about doing this for a decade or two and it's good to do it now rather than risk this material becoming unplayable and uncapturable - as it's pretty close to being now.

Some of the people involved were public figures who have since passed away (and others are still popular), so I see it as history now rather than as something they didn't pay me for.
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 11389Post Garrett Gilchrist »

How do you research, transfer, restore and work with rare, lost and vintage media? What are your tricks and secrets?
https://www.facebook.com/groups/619704656106298


Heritage Auctions and Ebay are often good for finding rare photographs and high quality scans. Google Image Search and TinEye feel increasingly limited, I think by design, but can still be useful for finding a larger version of an image.

Archive. org is good for sharing and finding VHS off-airs, as are certain private sites you're probably familiar with.

Topaz AI Gigapixel (paid program) can upscale photographs. I also keep a GUI EXE of Waifu2X Snowshell around for upscaling. It's not as good, but free, and more designed for animation. I can often get better results with a 50% 2X combination of the two, that is then upscaled further.

Remini, used as a mobile app, uses AI to approximate the look of faces in otherwise blurry photographs (and video, although this gets expensive fast). It is revisionist and therefore controversial but can be very useful when used carefully and sparingly, and perhaps combined at 50% opacity with a Topaz upscale.

Sometimes I do the "reducing contrast trick" which I explained here.
https://tygerbug.tumblr.com/post/616386 ... g-contrast

EBSynth is a style transfer program which can take the general appearance of a restored, colorized or otherwise higher-quality keyframe and propagate its appearance over a different or lower quality source (saved as an image sequence).

This is good for patching brief gaps when a video becomes lower quality or switches to a different source for a few frames. It was intended to make video look like "moving Van Gogh paintings" and can still be used for that.

Indeed the video will always look smeary after awhile. I was the first to use it for colorization, which is now a very common thing to do. I also used Deepremaster (in Google Colab) to plug gaps in the colorization, something I now feel is unnecessary.

I explained this in a Youtube video, which I gather was influential and much imitated.

Izotope RX8 (paid program) is useful for removing noise from audio (Spectral noise removal). It can also do vocal removal/isolation to an extent, and lots more. The free option for noise reduction has traditionally been Audacity, which isn't quite as good.

Ultimate Vocal Remover and/or Spleeter (in Google Colab) use AI to remove and isolate vocals from a piece of music, or other background noise.

IsoBuster is a paid program useful for copying damaged or problematic DVDs and ISO files. Worth the money if you have old DVDrs.

PFClean was/is an expensive professional program, useful for processes like removing dirt from a film transfer (using either MOVs or image sequences). I worked with professionals who already had access to this program in 2013 and still make use of it to an extent.

People seem to be using Phoenix processes for digital dirt removal these days, and I'm much more impressed by those results. I don't have access to that and still have to do a lot of my dirt removal by hand in Photoshop (for animation animated on ones for example, and serious damage), but that also gets better results even if it's arduous.



Joss Marlowe Hoskinson writes:
For research, I turn to to the U.S. Copyright Public Record System, Newspapers(dot)com, primary documents and sources (when available), and googleing as much as I can, making sure to archive everything I want to use as a source. (Learned the hard way, when I lost everything for a topic when Yahoo Groups were shut down.) I also use Wikipedia as a jumping off point and to help flesh out Loose Leaf Celluloid scripts, and I have been used Fandom wikis for basic information for shallow dives.

In terms of audio and video, I view myself more as an archivist and preservationist as opposed to a restorer. I'll do some work when there are very simple problems to fix that help something become more enjoyable -- fixing the speed/pitch of a recording, stabilizing and reconstructing a moment of video distortion, making a piece of black-and-white video footage grayscale to help with clarity, squashing/stretching footage to match another source, maybe a bit of color correction -- but I try to keep my hands off of everything as much as possible.
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 11399Post Garrett Gilchrist »

Raggedy Ann & Andy: A Musical Adventure 1977 35mm Ultra HD

Transferred from 35mm film in UHD by Helge Bernhardt and restored by Garrett Gilchrist.

New version 2 with 30 minutes of additional cleanup, often done by hand in Photoshop, frame by frame, to remove dirt and damage.

https://archive.org/details/raggedyannandy1977hd
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 11474Post Garrett Gilchrist »

>>"That overlaying technique with multiple takes off SLP tapes - Did you come up with that?"

These are all SP tapes. Oh, probably not. I started doing that on the Muppet restorations, because there was MPEG2 compression involved, and sometimes we had multiple tapes of an episode and sometimes we didn't. Ironically I didn't save any of those as anything but MPEG2 afterward because of disk space issues, but it improved quality.

I did come up with the idea of using EBSynth for colorization and AI enhancement, which caught on in the Doctor Who community in particular.
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Re: Video Restoration Thread

Post: # 11493Post Garrett Gilchrist »

I was the first to use a combination of DeOldify, Photoshop and EBSynth for colorization, and I think this Youtuber is using the same techniques.

This is also popular in the Doctor Who fandom (again via my recommendation). Either way, this shows what raw DeOldify looks like, versus doing additional work on the keyframes in Photoshop and running those through EBSynth.

I do a keyframe every second or two, although for this relatively static scene you could probably Photoshop a single, complex keyframe for every shot.

DeOldify can get you started, but the final keyframes could look like anything, as long as you're willing to put in the work in the keyframing. Relatively static scenes like this could have any amount of color complexity- for background detail or the medals a general might be wearing, for example. If there's more movement that would get trickier.

(It's possible that EBSynth is not being used here, but that would be my suggestion.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WungUWv8dhs
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