TV Thread

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Re: TV Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Sun Sep 18, 2016 11:13 pm

Spike Milligan's Q (5-7, 1969-1977) is finally coming out on DVD. A long time coming. I can't say I'm a particular fan, and a lot of the material will stand out as racist and sexist today, but Spike was undoubtedly one of the great comic geniuses of British television and radio. His unhinged, fast-paced, stream-of-consciousness brand of comedy was way ahead of its time, especially in the 1950s and 60s, when there was really nothing else like it about. Spike is remembered for the Goon Show with Peter Sellers and Harry Secombe, but Q5 - much of which is lost now - was a big influence on Monty Python's Flying Circus. It made them want to be weirder and step up their game. Though they could never match Spike for sheer madness.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/1-3-Q5-Q6-Q7-D ... 2169333610
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Re: TV Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Fri Sep 30, 2016 3:30 pm

https://theringer.com/luke-cage-black-c ... .624i77rhh

Blame the timid nature of Hollywood. I noticed this in the trailers for the series. I had difficulty getting through the second season of Daredevil too. These heroes, whose heyday was the 70s or 80s, beating up street-level crime and having empathy for someone like The Punisher, are inherently right-wing, or even full-on fascist.

Making these kids' stories into adult television shows the problems with them. They're simple fantasies when the world is more complex. It's fun as a kid to want Batman to beat up the bad guy who stole someone's purse. An adult should know that that's small potatoes, and that the larger problems are the institutional racism, income inequality and lack of opportunity that turn our poorest citizens into criminals in the first place. Crime is the symptom, not the problem, and any other response is childish, small-minded and, yes, right-wing.

I had a feeling that Luke Cage wouldn't be political in any left-wing way, despite starring a black hero. The trailers made that evident enough. The corporate overlords probably consider this the safe way to do this. That he's not "that kind of black guy."

I bet I'll enjoy this series, but it's 2016 and we all deserve better. We can't pretend these superhero stories are for adults while still having childish, small-town, street-level thinking. Jessica Jones, who first turned up in 2001 (a decision may have been made not to use the older character of Jessica Drew), is something new, intended as a more adult character and free of this old-fashioned thinking. At least for now.
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Re: TV Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Oct 06, 2016 2:00 pm

In the first episode (I think) they say Luke sounds like he's on FOX News, which is true. (Talking about the kids saying everyone has a gun and no one has a father - and we're supposed to take that as true in this reality, rather than a white supremacist meme.) The whole show trades in negative stereotypes and respectability politics. It's a little uncomfortable. I'm only on the first 3 episodes though.

Jessica Jones was kinda like this in its first episodes too (Jessica spouting off negative stereotypes about women like she'd internalized a lot of self-hate) so I'm still watching.

This has been kind of a consistent problem with the Netflix shows TBH.

It's great to have an almost all-black superhero show but this is a world of crime and criminals where the lead is all about being "respectable." Really it could have been created, if not written, by a FOX News host, ranting about "black on black crime."

It's a step in the right direction to tackle Luke Cage at all, and but after the very right wing and Frank Millery Daredevil season 2 they needed to win me back with their politics, and they haven't, so far.

Remember who the biggest name in respectability politics was? The non-threatening, "pull your pants up" successful black man on television, criticizing everyone else's standards?

Bill Cosby. He used it as a mask.

What I've seen of this series could not have been written by anyone who knows that much about racial politics in America. (There was a policy in place in America to not rent to black families with a father present, so that right-wingers could then talk about "absent fathers" - and so does Luke Cage. Like Daredevil or anyone talking about crime on a street level, it's blaming the street-level criminals rather than looking at the systematic problems that create crime. It's actually a problem that street cops think of themselves as Batman killing the bad guy. And they're trained to do that.)

I'm sure it's inherited that from the comics to an extent, since they're based on 70s blaxploitation and so is the show. Blaxploitation was always a second-rate genre which played with racist stereotypes to an extent. It doesn't surprise me that a character here name-checks Quentin Tarantino, who is also happy to present "cool" characters weighed down by racism rather than rising above it.

Luke Cage hates the N-word enough that he launches into a speech about it like Shakespeare's Shylock. Do you see an N-word before you? Sure, the N-word is certainly the worst word in our American language. But it's used in rap music and the vernacular to show an understanding between black Americans that they come from a nation which is heavily biased against them, and would reduce them to a stereotype. And, having understood that, maybe they can rise above that. It's a code word that shows a common understanding, and keeps white people out of the conversation. Maybe that's what Luke is objecting to.

The characters are "cool" enough that I'm happy to keep watching. And I'm hoping that like Jessica Jones, the self-hating stuff goes away after a bit and they get on with the story.

Oh, he used to be a cop? That explains the entire character ...

I liked the origin in episode 4. Funny how everyone looks darker in prison though. Apart from his lighter-skinned love interest. Because of course.

At least it's updated from the old comics, some of which are cringey now, like the original Black Mariah:

https://worldofblackheroes.files.wordpr ... ariah2.jpg

https://secure.static.tumblr.com/b514b4 ... c__640.jpg

Bonus from the same issue (I think):
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CXbBRrtWAAAQ_sk.jpg
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Re: TV Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Oct 06, 2016 2:42 pm

http://cartoonresearch.com/index.php/an ... dotes-266/

Jim Korkis writes:

In 1987, ABC turned to the ‘Q5 Corp’ to help with their Saturday morning cartoons. Q5 was a consulting company made up of Ph.D.s in psychology, marketing, advertising and research, and had previously done some work with ABC’s prime-time TV shows.

Jennie Trias, vice president of ABC’s children programs, told a reporter for the LATimes, “[The Q5 Corp] are a product testing group, and programs are basically a product that we want the public to buy. If it works, hopefully, we’ll succeed in getting good numbers.”

J. Michael Stracyznski (now one of the comic book industry’s most successful writers) was a story editor for the animated series The Real Ghostbusters at the time. His description of the Q5 Corp was faaar less kind.

J. Michael Stracyznski: “I think that they are evil. They wanted us to knock off all the corners. Janine was a strong, vibrant character. They wanted her to be more feminine, more maternal, more nurturing, like every other female on television. It is a truly insidious organization. A lot of their research and theories are strictly from voodoo. I think they reinforce stereotypes – sexist and racist. I think they are not helping television. They are diminishing it.”

The previously mentioned L.A. Times article then pointed out that due to input from Q5, “Last season, Janine, the secretary of The Real Ghostbusters produced for ABC by DIC Enterprises was a sharp-edged, miniskirted wisercracker with pointed glasses, dangling braclets and a fountain of spiky hair. As a result of Q5 input, she will have softer features, smoother hair, big round glasses and no jewelry. ABC will complete the package with a demure knee-length skirt.”

The notes on one of the new character drawings from DIC contained the notes: “generally less harsh and slutty, has a warmer, more nurturing relationship with Slimer, her face and expressions are prettier.”

Her voice was also softened, with Kath Soucie taking over the voice role from Laura Summer.



Later, Stracyznski wrote an episode titled, "Janine, You've Changed."

http://ghostbusters.wikia.com/wiki/Jani ... ve_Changed


C. Miller writes:

I was a writer on The Real Ghostbusters at the time of Q5. They were a nightmare. They were also later revealed to be frauds. They had never done any actual testing with children and we're simply giving out their opinions. The networks quickly ushered them out. I parodied them in an episode of The Bionic six I wrote the next year. (I wrote three episodes of The Real Ghostbusters' first season and then ten episodes of The Bionic Six. The one with the Q5 parody was "Ready... Aim... Fired!".)


A sort of corporate brainwashing seems to always be epidemic in kids' television. It can really teach kids all the wrong lessons and reinforce the worst things about our society. This must be fought ...
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Re: TV Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Fri Oct 07, 2016 12:20 am

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Re: TV Thread

Postby JustinHoskie » Sat Oct 22, 2016 12:24 pm

The Rocky Horror Picture Show Colon Let's Do the Time Warp Again Colon Movie Film for Television by Fall Out Boy was an amazingly fun, cheesy, visually stunning piece of crap.

I felt like I had the right expectations going in. Though I try to go into everything with the benefit of the doubt, I knew it would miss the mark of what the original musical and film tried to do (a perverted love letter to horror movies), especially after reading Richard O'Brien's thoughts on the project. And I knew it would be truly terrible, especially after the reviews came in. But, since I have no ties with the original, I was able to still have fun with it and admire the cast (especially Laverne Cox, Victoria Justice and Ryan McCartan), who I felt did an amazing job with what they were given.

It also did exactly what I wanted it to. It exposed me to the score and story, both of which I had absolutely no experience with, and it peaked my interest. I loved the score (for the most part; some of the songs felt like they went on twice as long as they should've), and, even though I could see that the story wasn't being told in the right way, I could see where it was coming from and could tell, if done right, it could be amazing. (And though I haven't watched the original film yet, I've seen like 10 seconds of it, which is enough to convince me that it is, indeed, the better version.)

In the end, was a love letter to cheesy horror movies? No. Was it even a love letter to the original? Meh? But, to me, whether intentional or not, it felt like a love letter to overblown TV musicals and everything fun (and terrible) about them, from the amazing choreography in The Wiz Live and the amazing sets of Grease Live, to Carrie Underwood's "acting" in The Sound of Music Live and the cheesiness of High School Musical.

Was it amazing? No. Should they have gotten someone besides Kenny Ortega -- who has spent too much time making stuff for Disney, resulting in this playing out like the DCOM version of Rocky Horror -- to helm this massive undertaking? Probably, yes. Was it exactly what I expected; a fun, crappy remake? Yes.
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Re: TV Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Sun Oct 23, 2016 6:06 pm

I was watching Ivy Levan's version of "Science Fiction Double Feature" from Rocky Horror …
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiNEYHP9TWI

… and I'm not a big Rocky Horror fan or anything but it's 43 years later and the movie references in the song clearly mean nothing to Ivy or to the remake's target audience. When I was young watching it, some of the references passed me by but they all go whizzing by today.


So:


We had Netflix and chill The Day The Earth Stood Still
with Keanu Reeves and Jon Hamm.
And Flash Gordon was ready with his theme song by Freddie
Chevy Chase was the Invisible Man
Then something went wrong
For Jack Black and King Kong
They got caught in a CGI jam
Then at a deadly pace
Matt LeBlanc was Lost In Space
And this is how the message ran...

Science fiction (ooh ooh ooh) remake or sequel
George directs a (ooh ooh ooh) Star Wars prequel
See twenty somethings playing (ooh ooh ooh) Brad and Janet
It might as well be (ooh ooh ooh) another planet
You'll feel old
At the sci fi, prequel sequel, remake show

Now you're playing the lead
In a show which premiered
Twenty years before you even were born
And it isn't a joke
'Cause Tim Curry's had a stroke
And you can't bring it back, it's already gone
It's the Rocky Horror show
But you really don't know
What these lyrics are even about
When generations collide
Said George Pal to his bride
You can Google it and figure it out
Kind of …

Science fiction (ooh ooh ooh) remake feature
American Idol (ooh ooh ooh) built a creature
It's forty years since (ooh ooh ooh) the original context
Let's do it again now (ooh ooh ooh) without the subtext
You'll feel old
At the sci fi, prequel sequel, remake show
Don't wanna go - Oh oh oh oh
To the sci fi, prequel sequel, remake show
What's R.K.O.? - Wo oh oh oh
At the Rocky Horror remake TV show
It's getting cold - Oh oh oh oh
At the late night, double feature … (coughing)
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Re: TV Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Fri Nov 25, 2016 11:00 pm

MST3K fans, it's a very happy Turkey Day as the first two full episodes of MST3K ever (Invaders From the Deep and Revenge of the Mysterons From Mars) have now been released for the first time ever for supporters of the MST3K revival kickstarter! These episodes have been seen by nobody since the show premiered in 1988. You might recall that I compiled existing clips into a short awhile back. The pilot "The Green Slime" has been shown publicly in full, and partly released on VHS/DVD (and restored by me). Episode 3 of the series remains unseen.
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Re: TV Thread

Postby FloorMat116 » Sun Dec 18, 2016 10:23 pm

'Mr. Robot' creator Sam Esmail is developing a mini-series based on the silent classic 'Metropolis'.
Article at Collider http://bit.ly/2hv5J13
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Re: TV Thread

Postby filmfan94 » Mon Mar 06, 2017 7:07 pm

R. I. P. Robert Osbourne (I loved his intros on TCM)

http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/robert- ... 202002748/
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