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Re: Random Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:38 am

A former drone pilot goes on record:
http://openchannel.nbcnews.com/_news/20 ... 600-deaths
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Re: Random Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:48 am

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Re: Random Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:52 am

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Re: Random Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:53 am

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Re: Random Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Jun 06, 2013 11:46 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... pg#t=2272s

Discussing Looney Tunes: Back in Action.

Ugh. At least we see some nice pencil tests from the great Eric Goldberg, and Joe Dante obviously meant well, with all the cartoony movies he's made over the years. But ... ugh. I haven't seen BIA, and these clips from the movie itself seem to literally be about how impossible it is to make a real Looney Tunes movie today. That the corporate suits are always watching. Reminds me of Blooper Bunny, things like that. The CGI-like shading on the Looney Tunes characters is obnoxious and robs them of their charm. It's taken to a level beyond Roger Rabbit and Space Jam, and the live action characters seem pointless. Maybe I should actually watch this one.

This clip from Space Jam sums it up ....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KF_VR89-0Jw

I should watch BIA. I've been curious. Like Space Jam, the problem is that it's not the Looney Tunes movie people really want to see, and that the animators are capable of. You get nice animation, but this corporatized vision of the characters. The 40s and 50s are long gone now, and not coming back ... the best we could hope for is something like the recent Muppets movie, where the old characters are written in an entirely different style, to middling effect. [I suppose that's what The Looney Tunes show is.]

I know that Joe Dante can deliver an eccentric, cartoony, layered movie .... Gremlins 2 being a good example. But did he literally make a Looney Tunes movie about how impossible it is to make a Looney Tunes movie? Now you've got me curious.

That almost reminds me of The Brothers Grimm, a Terry Gilliam movie where the director was fighting with producer Harvey Weinstein the entire time. Weinstein wanted Gilliam to deliver a more commercial sort of summer movie, which the script was clearly written as. Gilliam doesn't do commercial, summer movies- he likes darkly eccentric, unusual, artsy pieces. So the entire movie has this very passive-aggressive, annoyed tone to it, where Gilliam is directing it angrily, and amusing himself in little ways when he can, and it's sort of eating itself. The movie is fighting itself the whole time.

Perhaps it's a fool's errand to bring back the Looney Tunes now. Maybe we should all just move on.

Eric Goldberg is a great animator, but his style is elegant and flowing and amorphous. It's not heavy and solid like Richard Williams' work. Compare Williams' recent Circus Drawings with anything from Princess and the Frog, and it's like comparing a solid rock with a plate of jello. People underestimate the thought process that made Roger Rabbit and company seem solid. I'd rather see Goldberg's work as normal 2D in a cartoon setting, as in Aladdin. It's great to look at, but actually less impressive in a live action setting. The original Looney Tunes were more solid ....

Andrew Kaiko writes: "Joe Dante refused to ever talk about this movie now, and shuns anyone who tries to bring it up. He did it purely as a tribute to his idol Chuck Jones who at that time died more recently."

I smell a director who basically had a gun put to his head by the producers throughout production. I suspect that Gremlins 2 was exactly the opposite; that he could do whatever silly thing he liked.

Without wanting to oversimplify and insult both men, Goldberg's work is light, playful, cartoony and fun, with characters moving quickly, flowing like water, and dancing in the air. Richard Williams is obsessed with form and weight. His characters are heavy and solid. They don't move easily- they shake and stutter all over the place and think it through even when moving quickly. His recent film Circus Drawings is a study in hyperrealism at times, with gravity and physics slowing down rather than the characters, to affirm their solidity. He has more in common with Chuck Jones than Bob Clampett.

It took a Richard Williams, and a Robert Zemeckis, to make Roger Rabbit work. It took a good idea, a specific story and a specific tone. The fact that the lead character was not a known entity like Bugs Bunny helped; Williams et al. could animate the character in a way conducive to live action. The noir-styled lighting and ideas grounded the piece.

I recall some scenes in Space Jam where the lighting gets darker and it "seems like Bugs and Daffy are really there." There's a lot of bright lighting in these movies though, and a lot of animation that would work better without someone sticking Michael Jordan or Jenna Elfman into the frame.

The shading in Back in Action is overdone. They're trying to look like CGI. And from what little I've seen, the live action is more flat and cartoony than the cartoon work.

I should watch this film ... see what I think of it otherwise ....
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Re: Random Thread

Postby Garrett Gilchrist » Thu Jun 06, 2013 2:29 pm

http://www.amazon.com/Flat-TV-Phil-Hart ... B00006SFAB

Phil Hartman recorded a comedy album called Flat TV in 1977 or so. They're planning to animate it now ....
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Re: Random Thread

Postby Nobies » Thu Jun 06, 2013 2:36 pm

Back In Action sucks, make no mistake, but somehow in all the mess, a genuine and committed comedic performance by Steve Martin comes out of it. Probably the last time he ever gave one of those.
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Re: Random Thread

Postby Oliver Judd » Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:24 pm

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